KUIS-SolBridge workshop – Exploring leadership as a conceptualization

Students from KUIS in Japan and from SolBridge in South Korea worked in teams to explore leadership as a conceptualization in a workshop conducted at KUIS. They were highly motivated and seemed to enjoy the activities, reflecting on and discussing leadership as a conceptualization. By doing so, they were able to learn more about themselves and each other, which was good for relationship building.

Reference

Knight, K. (2017). Exploring leadership as a conceptualization [PowerPoint presentation in KUIS-SolBridge workshop]. Chiba, Japan: Kanda University of International Studies.

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Inaugural Global Challenge Program

In the first Global Challenge business training and leadership development program at KUIS, students from KUIS in Japan and SolBridge in South Korea worked in teams to act as international consultants and provide solutions (and leadership visions) to business challenges provided by the Japanese organization YAMASU.

Reference

Knight, K. (2017a). Exploring YAMASU and the food industry from multiple perspectives with SWOT and PEST analytical approaches [PowerPoint presentation in Global Challenge business training program]. Chiba, Japan: Kanda University of International Studies.

Website: Business research in preparation for company visit

Knight, K. (2017b). ESP strands in a business case study programTESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Global Leadership Competition in the SALC

Description
In the Global Leadership Competition in the KUIS SALC, the participants will be asked to perform tasks (in accordance with SALC principles) that help them to learn about leadership and to develop leadership skills. In addition, they will learn about leadership research, and the competition itself will contribute to research on leadership conceptualization and leadership communication. The tasks in the competition will require the students to make full use of the facilities in the new SALC building, which is to be completed by April 2017.
References

Knight, K. (2010). English for Specific Purposes (ESP) Modules in the Self-Access Learning Center (SALC) for Success in the Global Workplace. Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal1(2), 119-128.

Knight, K. (2011). Developing ESP modules for self-access learning center. [PowerPoint presentation]. New Orleans, LA: TESOL 2011.

Knight, K. (2016). Leadership and learner autonomy for achieving your dreams. TESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2017). ESP training for student consulting purposesTESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2017). Leadership development for KUIS students: Consulting programs in the KUIS SALC [PowerPoint presentation in SALC Advisory Committee Meeting]. Chiba, Japan. Kanda University of International Studies.

ESP Project Leader Profiles

Description

The ESP Project Leader Profiles focus on the leadership conceptualization and professional communication of ESP project leaders! In the reference section below, you will be able to read the profiles of ESP project leaders worldwide.

These ESP project leader profiles are described (in an email sent to me) by Karen Schwelle at Washington University in St. Louis as “a nice way to communicate what we do and offer practical, experience-based advice for fellow ESPers around the world.” I agree, and I also think we can learn something about how ESP professionals use communication to achieve success.

– See more at: http://blog.tesol.org/esp-project-leader-profile-kristin-ekkens/#sthash.tRNOv4li.dpuf

References

Go here for all of the ESP project leader profiles and more.

The ESP Project Leader Profiles

  1. May 5, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kristin Ekkens
  2. June 2, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Charles Hall
  3. July 14, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Ronna Timpa
  4. August 11, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Evan Frendo
  5. September 8, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jaclyn Gishbaugher
  6. October 6, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Anne Lomperis
  7. October 20, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Ethel Swartley
  8. November 3, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: David Kertzner
  9. December 1, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Margaret van Naerssen
  10. December 15, 2015: ESP Project Leader Profile: Marvin Hoffland
  11. January 12, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: John Butcher
  12. January 26, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Karen Schwelle
  13. February 23, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Esther Perez Apple
  14. March 8, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kevin Knight
  15. April 5, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Shahid Abrar-ul-Hassan
  16. May 3, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Robert Connor
  17. May 17, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jigang Cai
  18. June 14, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Ismaeil Fazel
  19. June 28, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Yilin Sun
  20. July 26, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Tarana Patel
  21. August 23, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Prithvi Shrestha
  22. September 6, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Robin Sulkosky
  23. October 18, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Philip Chappell
  24. November 2, 2016: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jie Shi
  25. December 13, 2016: The 25th ESP Project Leader Profile: Laurence Anthony
  26. January 24, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Barrie Roberts
  27. February 7, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Jen Cope
  28. February 21, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Susan Barone
  29. March 21, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Debra Lee
  30. April 18, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kay Westerfield
  31. May 2, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Stephen Horowitz
  32. June 14, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Pam Dzunu
  33. July 11, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Marta Baffy
  34. August 8, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Vince Ricci
  35. September 6, 2017: ESP Project Leader Profile: Kirsten Schaetzel

Additional blog posts related to the ESP Project Leader Profiles

Additional ESP-related professional development activities

Knight, K. (2004). The ‘Be my guest’ instructor training program. [PowerPoint presentation]. Nara, JA: JALT 2004.

Knight, K. (2010). English for specific purposes: An overview for practitioners and clients (Academic and corporate). [PowerPoint presentation]. Boston, MA: TESOL 2010.

Knight, K. (2011). English for specific purposes: Imagine the possibilities. [PowerPoint presentation]. New Orleans, LA: TESOL 2011.

Knight, K. (2012a). The impact of culture on effective communication in ESP contexts. TESOL Connections. Alexandria, VA: TESOL. Retrieved from http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/tesolc/issues/2012-01-01/index.html

Knight, K. (2012b). TESOL ESPIS community discussions 2011-2012. Professional and Academic English, 39, 31-32.

Knight, K. (2012c). The impact of culture on effective communication in ESP contexts. [PowerPoint presentation]. Philadelphia, PA: TESOL 2012.

Knight, K. (2013a). Online professional development program for ESP global community. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 25, 23-47.

Knight, K. (2013b). Training ESP practitioners online: From T-mail to TESOL community discussions. [PowerPoint presentation]. Dallas, TX: TESOL 2013.

Knight, K. (Organizer and moderator). (2016). TESOL-IATEFL online discussion about how ESP projects can create positive social change. [Virtual seminar]. Hosted by TESOL International Association. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.

Knight, K. (2016). TESOL ESP project leader profiles for professional development of ESP practitioners worldwide [Featured presentation]. In Joint International Conference, ESP in Asia: Frontier and Advancement, The 8th International Conference on ESP in Asia & The 3rd International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP in Japan. Tokyo, Japan: UEC.

Knight, K. (2016). Viewing co-constructed conceptualizations of ESP in multiple genres. In K. Knight (Ed.), ESP News. Alexandria, VA: TESOL.

Knight, K. (2016). TESOL ESP project leader profiles for professional development of ESP practitioners worldwide. In Conference Proceedings of Joint International Conference, ESP in Asia: Frontier and Advancement, The 8th International Conference on ESP in Asia & The 3rd International Symposium on Innovative Teaching and Research in ESP in Japan. Tokyo, Japan: UEC.

Knight, K. (2017). English for specific purposes project leader profiles. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 29.

Leadership seminars

Description

Leaders in companies are often considered to be successful members of society. The KUIS seminars, which are conducted for 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in the International Business Career major, focus on understanding leadership in an organization (e.g., a company):

  1. What is leadership?
  2. How do leaders practice leadership?
  3. How do leaders communicate?
  4. What are leadership skills?
  5. How can leadership (skills) be developed?
  6. What can we learn from leaders?
  7. How can research on leadership be conducted?

The seminars are conducted in English only and may focus on the material from various articles or from a book such as the following:

  • Nohria, N. & Khurana, R. (Eds.) (2010). Handbook of leadership theory and practice: A Harvard Business School centennial colloquium. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press.
  • Liu, L. (2010). Conversations on leadership: Wisdom from global management gurus. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  • Fairhurst, G. (2011). The power of framing: Creating the language of leadership. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

The research in the seminars is related to leadership (i.e., leadership in practice, leadership communication, leadership development, leadership identity, leadership and gender, etc.).  For example:

  • Interviews with leaders (original research, etc.) to understand leadership in different organizations/industries
  • Examining the spoken and written communications of leaders (speeches, interviews annual reports, websites, etc.)
  • Examining the communication in leadership teams
  • Examining leadership development programs/approaches (and/or their effectiveness)
  • Investigating the difference between male and female leadership styles
  • Investigating the difference between leadership in different types of organizations

Project-based learning is also an important part of the seminars as the participants learn to communicate to create and achieve their visions in a socially responsible manner.

References

Knight, K. (2011). Discourses of leadership as basis for developing leadership communication skills: Obtaining the insights of leaders through semi-structured interviews [PowerPoint presentation]. Sydney, AU: Macquarie University HDRO Showcase.

Knight, K. (2012). Discourses of leadership as basis for developing leadership communication skills: Co-construction of online forum [PowerPoint presentation]. Sydney, Australia: Macquarie University HDRO Showcase.

Knight, K. (2013a). Looking at communication through a leadership lens. TESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2013b). The S.T.A.R. format in identifying and generating conceptualizations of leadership in study of discourses of leadership. [PowerPoint presentation]. Sydney, Australia: Macquarie University HDRO Showcase.

Knight, K. (2014a). Teaching leadership communication skills to Japanese learners through online forum. [PowerPoint Presentation]. Portland, Oregon: TESOL 2014.

Knight, K. (2014b). Creation of online forum for leadership development of KUIS students. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 26, 195-223.

Knight, K. (2015). Teaching leadership with the world’s first $9 computer. TESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2015). Analysing the discourses of leadership as a basis for developing leadership communication skills in a second or foreign language. Sydney, Australia: Macquarie University.

Knight, K., & Candlin, C.N. (2015). Leadership discourse as basis and means for developing L2 students into future leaders. In P. Shrestha (Ed.), Current developments in English for academic and specific purposes: Local innovations and global perspectives (pp. 27-50). Reading, UK: Garnet.

 

English for Business Career (EBC) courses

Description

The International Business Career (IBC) major was established in the Department of International Communication. A primary attraction of the IBC major for prospective students is that they can study both business and the English language.

In the IBC major, four English for Business Career courses (EBC 1, 2, 3, 4) were created. Knight (2014) describes the development of those courses. The EBC courses were originally designed so that students would take them in order from EBC 1 to EBC 4. (See below the focus and learner’s role in each course as adapted from Knight, 2014, p. 12). The aim was for students to experience each business role in succession, starting with the role of company employee and finishing with the role of business founder. Accordingly, the Leadership Seminars complement the EBC courses.

EBC 1 

Focus: Business communication

  • Business communication in the office (meeting people, telephoning, company performance)
  • Business meetings (based on short business case studies; human resources, marketing, investment)
  • Personal accomplishment stories (in preparation for job interviews or study abroad; situation, action, result)

Learner’s role

  • Student in business communication class
  • Learner
  • Prospective employee
  • Employee

EBC 2

Focus: Business strategy

  • Business case studies (for native English speakers)
  • Materials (PowerPoint presentations and business case studies; marketing, operations, people, finance, strategy, external development)
  • Activities (selecting case studies, making presentations, leading discussions of case studies in class)

Learner’s role

  • Student in business case study class
  • Teacher
  • Manager

EBC 3

Focus: Business management

  • Onsite and online business management simulation.
  • Students are owners of small businesses and must make strategic decisions concerning business operations.
  • Students learn about financial statements (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement), strategic management, and business ethics.
  • Students work in teams to make business decisions and deliver presentations about company performance.

Learner’s role

  • Student in business simulation class
  • President
  • Partner
  • Business owner

EBC 4

Focus: Business creation

  • Students learn about the important factors in making a business plan by conducting research and making team presentations.
  • Students learn about organizations in the U.S. that support business start-ups.
  • Students compete to put together the best business plans and make team presentations.

Learner’s role

  • Student in business entrepreneurship class
  • Partner
  • Business founder

References

Knight, K. (2010). Teaching intellectual property English creatively. [PowerPoint presentation]. Nagoya, JA: JALT 2005.

Knight, K. (2011a). Teaching intellectual property (IP) English creatively. In A. Stewart (Ed.), JALT2010 conference proceedings (pp. 619-626). Tokyo, JA: JALT.

Knight, K. (2011b). Teaching business skills and ethics through airline management simulation. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 23, 49-73.

Knight, K. (2012). Teaching business case studies through PowerPoint presentations. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 24, 1-28.

Knight, K. (2013). Global resources in ESP: Kickstarter!. TESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2014). Preparing undergraduate students in Japan for the global workplace through four EBC courses. Professional and Academic English, 42, 8-14.

Knight, K. (2015). Teaching business English and project leadership with Shark Tank. TESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2015). Using an entrepreneurship video for interview training. TESOL Blog. Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL International Association.

Knight, K. (2016). Conducting professional communication training with Kickstarter. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 28, 233-252.

Kevin’s Company (a business consulting simulation)

Description

In the year-long internship program, the participants perform in an extended role play in which they act as business consultants in a simulated consulting company (i.e., not a real company) titled Kevin’s Company.

  • Each participant is assigned to a consulting team.
  • Classroom sessions are conducted as company meetings.
  • The instructor is a native English speaker.
  • The instructor teaches business research and business communication to the participants and directly supervises the consulting teams.
  • All meetings are conducted in English.
  • The meetings are conducted in two locations: 1) KUIS and 2) British Hills (BH).
  • The client of Kevin’s Company is British Hills.
  • The participants work in small teams to conduct business research in connection with British Hills.
  • The teams prepare presentations and reports in which they give their recommendations for improving the business operations of British Hills.

The aim of the internship program is to give a leadership experience to the participants. At British Hills, the participants interact with the leaders of the various departments and are treated not as undergraduate students but as business professionals.

References

Knight, K. (2006). Kevin’s company at KUIS. [PowerPoint presentation]. Fukuoka, JA: JALT 2006.

Knight, K. (2007). Kevin’s company at KUIS. [PowerPoint presentation]. Ibaraki, JA: JALT Ibaraki Chapter.

Knight, K. (2008a). Global workforce development through business internship program: Kevin’s company at Kanda University of International Studies. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 20, 207-234.

Knight, K. (2008b). Kevin’s company at KUIS. [PowerPoint presentation]. New York, NY: TESOL 2008.

Knight, K. (2008c). Kevin’s company from the perspective of professional communication research. [PowerPoint presentation]. Hong Kong: APACLSP 2008.

Knight, K. (2009). Business internship program development in light of professional communication research: Kevin’s company at Kanda University of International Studies. In V. Bhatia, W. Cheng, V. Du-Babcock, & J. Lung (Eds.), Language for professional communication: Research, practice & training (pp. 235-249). Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong, Asia-Pacific LSP and Professional Communication Association and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Knight, K. (2010a). Leadership development in business internship program: Kevin’s company at Kanda University of International Studies. The Journal of Kanda University of International Studies, 22, 245-273.

Knight, K. (2010b). Framing for success in business internship program. [PowerPoint presentation]. Kuala Lumpur, MY: APACLSP 2010.

Knight, K. (2011). Kevin’s company at KUIS. [PowerPoint presentation]. New Orleans, LA: TESOL 2011.

Knight, K. (2012g). Developing global competencies and leadership skills in undergraduates: The evolution of Kevin’s company at KUIS in the light of ESP best practices. [PowerPoint presentation]. Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology: 2012 International Conference & Workshop on English for Specific Purposes.

Knight, K. (2012). Developing global competencies and leadership skills in undergraduates: The evolution of Kevin’s company at KUIS in the light of ESP best practices. In conference proceedings of 2012 International Conference & Workshop on English for Specific Purposes. Tainan, Taiwan: Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology.

Knight, K. (2012). Creatively designing intensive business English programs to meet learner needs. [PowerPoint presentation]. Philadelphia, PA: TESOL 2012.

Knight, K. (2013a). Leadership: A crucial variable in a business internship program. [PowerPoint presentation]. Dallas, TX: TESOL 2013.

Knight, K. (2013b). Developing global competencies and leadership skills in undergraduates: The evolution of Kevin’s company in the light of ESP best practices. [PowerPoint presentation]. Dallas, TX: TESOL 2013.